Monthly Archives: July 2011

Reflections on “Librarians” thread in Atlas

I really found the figures on pp.144 – 152 of the Atlas (Figures 60-71) to be illuminating in terms of showing the evolution of the creation of the knowledge management system (Lankes, 2011).  In general, I am liking the graphics in the textbook a lot better for this thread, probably because I am understanding them better than in previous threads.  This graphic illustration gives me some insight into what the creators of the first online learning management systems for colleges must have went through in terms of planning or mapping it out – in particular I find the figure of the learning management system presented in Figure 65 for IST 613 to be a lot like Blackboard (Lankes, 2011, p.149) – I imagine it might have been what the original learning management system for the iSchool looked like until we switched over to Blackboard this summer.

I also loved the innovative ideas of what libraries could potentially lend out, under the “Circulation” subsection – in particular the idea of lending out e-book readers, laptops, and experts in a particular field (Lankes, 2011, p. 166).  I would love the ability to check out a e-book reader to share with my preschoolers at the community center  – it might be hard convincing my board that we had the funds to invest in one now, so checking it out from the library would be ideal.  I also liked how public librarian Meg Backus explained in our class (511: Introduction to the Library and Information Profession) today how she came up with the innovative idea of members in her library checking out her dog – something that sounded was a really successful program and that members of all ages enjoyed.  At my current public library, Fletcher Free Library, I know people can check out gardening tools, such as rakes or hoes, which seems to be popular as organic and “do-it-yourself” gardening is trendy in Burlington, and we also have several community gardening programs in the area.  When I was growing up, at the library I went to, the St. Johnsbury Athenaeum (also in Vermont), I used to check out bags of toys, like a board game or a Fisher Price play set (those things are durable – I own two that are older than I am that my preschoolers still love playing with).  I think this a great idea for a children’s section of a public library – I remember that when I volunteered as a teenager at that library kids checked out the toys all the time.

I strongly agree with Lankes’ opinion that paraprofessionals in the library field are undervalued and go largely unappreciated for their work (Lankes, 2011, p. 177).  This is something that happens frequently in the educational world – paraprofessionals are not trained enough nor paid enough considering that they sometimes spend all their day with students that have the most challenging behaviors and can sometimes be quite physically and verbally abusive to them.

Finally, I would like to say that the overall mission/theme that Lankes presented throughout his book, “The mission of librarians is to improve society through facilitating knowledge in their communities” (Lankes, 2011, p. 15) is a worldview I can closely relate to.  As an educator, I already hold facilitating knowledge of the utmost importance.  As someone who works at a community center for the community they also live in, I strive towards improving society everyday by serving my community as a member of that community.  I look forward to continuing this mission and the values I hold so dear as a librarian.

References

Lankes, R.D. (2011).  The Atlas of new librarianship.  Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.

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Reflections on “Improve Society” thread in Atlas

I really found the discussion on how the policy changed in terms of teachers analyzing media and education information (Lankes, 2011, pp.118-119), to be interesting from a teacher’s perspective.  I remember how when when I first started taking coursework for elementary education (early 2003) we discussed ERIC as being a major database for finding great lesson plans and I was amazed at how many were available.  And then the conversation about it died down, so much so that when I was actually out in the work force, teaching math to a variety of elementary grade levels and working with a variety of classroom teachers (late 2004 – 2006), I don’t remember anyone mentioning it.  I became curious about the current state of the AskERIC website, so I searched some different topics (http://www.eduref.org/Virtual/Lessons/index.shtml) like nutrition and art, at the Pre-K level and found that the lessons were posted in 2003 or earlier (several dated back to 1997).  Finally I found a little more background on what had happened – I had noticed that the header on the top of the page was not called ERIC, but was referred to as “the Educator’s Reference Desk”  (I had noticed when I googled AskERIC I had been redirected to this site).  It explained how in 1993, the Information Institute of Syracuse was the first to place a search interface to ERIC on the web.  Despite its popularity, the United States Department of Education closed all ERIC clearinghouses and AskERIC on December 31, 2003 and started reorganizing ERIC.  So the Informational Institute of Syracuse moved the search engine for lesson plans to the Educator’s Reference Desk site (http://www.eduref.org/Eric/).  At the end of this page there was a link to the ERIC site at www.eric.ed.gov.  So I looked at that too, and found that in its current state the ERIC website contains documents from the last several years,  but they are mainly all scholarly articles, and if you do find something that resembles a lesson plan it is usually an abstract from a lesson that was in a periodical and you have to link to another site if you want the full text or purchase a back issue of the periodical from the publisher.  So the ERIC site is no longer helpful for finding quick lesson plans if your an elementary teacher whose class is studying nutrition, for example.  I would recommend the Educator’s Reference Desk instead.  It is disappointing that ERIC no longer exists in the capacity it used to.

I could relate to the point Lankes made about undergrad students using Wikipedia as a starting point (Lankes, 2011, p.120).  During our preparation for group presentations for IST 601: Information & Information Environments we discussed how we sometimes using Wikipedia or Google or Google Scholar when we are starting a more broad search, and even though they are not the most scholarly or academic of databases, they often give you ideas of other sources you can look at.

In terms of innovation, the ideas Lankes proposed for managers to foster innovation (Lankes, 2011, p.128) reminded me a lot of the ideas endorsed by Robert Sutton in the article, “The Weird Rules of Creativity” (Sutton, 2001).  It was fresh in my mind from discussing it in our IST 601 class.  For instance, both Lankes and Sutton advocate creating a safe environment for risk, giving the staff time to play, and rewarding failure as well as success.  I am glad that I currently work in an environment that allow for experimentation and risk and does not penalize minor failures when they are an attempt at something new.  For instance, in late June, the development coordinator and I tried holding a comedy event as a fundraiser for my organization.  We didn’t make a profit, because not many people showed up and we were charged for microphones we didn’t end up using (which was totally my fault, due to a miscommunication with the performers).  It could have definitely been viewed as a failure. But the people who came had a great time, the board thanked me for helping to organize it, and it gave us ideas of how we might change the venue, the format of the show, and how we advertised if we were to do another comedy event.

Also, I was glad that Lankes briefly discussed diversity in terms of it helping librarians to facilitate conversations (Lankes, 2011, p. 124).  I feel diversity, be it culture, religion, language, or any number of other determinants, helps broaden our perspective of the world.  During my junior year at Wellesley College, my first education course was Issues in Multicultural Education, taught by the dynamic professor Veronica Darer.  In the class we had a truly diverse group of students, who came from dramatically different backgrounds of ethnicity, socio-economic status, religion, nationality, and sexual orientation.   The conversations we had in that class were what I found most valuable – they were an eye-opening experience – students shouted and cried in that class on a fairly regular basis as they expressed how their background had profoundly affected their educational experiences.  That course shook me to the core, each class was emotionally draining, yet it was probably my favorite course during my undergrad years.  It shaped how I will view education, especially in terms of multiculturalism, for the rest of my life, and it shaped who I became as a teacher and how I taught.

References

The Educator’s Reference Desk. (n.d.)  http://www.eduref.org/Eric and http://www.eduref.org/Virtual/Lessons/index.shtml.  Retrieved on July 17, 2011.

Education Resources Information Center.  (n.d.) http://www.eric.ed.gov/.  Retrieved on July 17, 2011.

Lankes, R.D. (2011).  The Atlas of new librarianship.  Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.

Sutton, R.I. (2001).  The weird rules of creativity.  Harvard Business Review, 79 (8), 94.


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Reflection on Communities thread in the Atlas

Lankes stated that as users, we are becoming both more self-sufficient on information services and more dependent and reliant upon the information we get from them (Lankes, 2011, p. 90).  I can definitely relate to this on a personal basis.  Last Friday, my internet stopped working.  I immediately panicked – what was I going to do?  I had online assignments to turn in, readings I had to do online, Blackboard discussions I had to read.  I also felt cut off from the outside world and my friends.  It was my worst nightmare – how could I not connect to the Internet when my classes were all online and the residency was only a week away?  Luckily, my story of crisis has a happy ending – I was able to call my internet provider at the national number, and we determined it was a modem problem.  At first they said I needed a technician to come and fix it, and that wouldn’t happen until Monday afternoon.  Two days away? And I was working during the week, so weekends were my crunch time for school work.  With a suggestion from my boyfriend, who was out of town, I realized I could try switching the modem at the local service center for my provider.  I did this – they told me my old modem was really outdated, but the new one should work.  Still, they suggested, keep the technician appointment in case it didn’t.  When I got home, after screwing in a few cables and plugging in some wires, a little bit of patience, and voila!  I had working internet again.  I may have unhooked the cable in the process, but I eventually figured how to reconfigure that with the new modem as well.  Problem solved within  a few hours instead of a few days – I could even cancel what would have been a costly technical appointment.  I had never done anything like that before, and anyone who knew me was impressed, as they know my lack of technological prowess.  Self-sufficiency won out, but in the process I did realize how very dependent on the Internet I was.  It was a little unnerving.

Lankes discusses curriculum mapping several times throughout this thread (Lankes, 2011 pp. 94,112-113).  I am already some what familiar with curriculum mapping from my yearly and weekly planning as a preschool teacher, and also as a former teacher of elementary school math.  Teaching preschool is great in terms of curriculum planning, because the Vermont Early Learning Standards, which we follow, emphasize a cross-disciplinary approach, that allow you to easily see how any theme or activity you are completing with your students connects to the different domains of learning (The Vermont Early Childhood Work Group, 2003).

I feel my background in understanding cross-disciplinary connections will help me in terms of curriculum mapping as a librarian.  Several of the elementary schools in Burlington, where I live, recently became magnet schools that take a cross-disciplinary approach in terms of the arts and sustainability, and have become the Integrated Arts Academy and the Sustainability Academy, respectively.   As Lankes implied, modification of lesson plans to meet your students’ needs is crucial (Lankes, 2011, p. 113).  In Burlington, both my group of students and the students at the Integrated Arts Academy and the Sustainability Academy include a high population of English Language Learners (ELL) that come from immigrant and refugee families.  I am constantly going over  my curricula and changing my lesson plans to better suit their interests and needs.  At the elementary school level in Burlington,  I know through talking with several staff members that there have been many recent discussions and debates on how to better incorporate the idea of diversity into the schools, and how to make accommodations for the ELL students in terms of standardized testing.

In terms of public librarianship, I have to mention that I continue to be impressed with the work of the Free Library of Philadelphia that Lankes details in this thread (Lankes, 2011, pp. 97-100).  By being focused on the different communities within the members they serve, and reaching out to them through ongoing conversation, they are better able to find out what the musicians, business owners, and writers of their community want out of their relationship with the library (Lankes, 2011, pp.97-100).

References

Lankes, R.D. (2011).  The Atlas of new librarianship.  Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.

Vermont Early Childhood Work Group (2003).  Vermont early learning standards: Guiding the development and learning

     of children entering kindergarten.  Retrieved July 16, 2011

     from http://dcf.vermont.gov/sites/dcf/files/pdf/cdd/care/2006-03-29-

      VELS_booklet.pdf

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Reflection on the third thread of the Atlas: Facilitating

The subsection on Members Not Patrons or Users and Lankes’ quote “If you see yourself as a tool for the people, you have a job.  If you see yourself as a member of the community, you have a vocation – a calling – a mission”  (Lankes, 2011, p.66) really got me thinking about how I want to view myself as a future librarian.  I want being a librarian to be so much more than a job or even a career for me – I hope it shapes who I am and how I define myself.  My current work as a preschool teacher/administrator for a small community center in the area where I live is so much more than a job to me.  I value the work there that I do, the colleagues I have, and most importantly, the children and families our organization serves (our “members” you might say).  Being a preschooler teacher has become a defining characteristic of my life – it’s not what I do, it is part of who I am.  I want it to be the same way when I become a librarian.  Furthermore, as someone who works for a nonprofit community center, I also like Lankes’ idea of true facilitation through shared ownership and a librarian being of,  and not just for, the people (Lankes, 2011, p.65-66).  I like the inclusion and participation that is implied by such a theory.

I also really enjoyed the subsection on the Need for an Expanded Definition of Literacy (Lankes, 2011, p. 73-75).  I have to agree with Lankes’ criticism of the “Read” posters – they are not the best marketing for a library or literacy, though you see them all the time in school libraries and in some elementary classrooms.  I much prefer the posters in the children’s section of my local public library that promote a particular author or character from a series of books – at least then they are being more specific, and children can relate to the characters or note how it is one of their favorite authors.  I really like Lankes’ idea for “Ask” posters (Lankes, 2011, p. 73-74).  You don’t a librarian to help you read, but you do need them if you have to ask a question about a topic you are exploring and want more information on.  Plus there is a conversational and active element to the idea of “asking” which reflects many of the themes of the Atlas, while “reading” seems more individualized and passive.

I really enjoyed Lankes mentioning radical texts and how fiction can be empowering (2011, p. 74).  Although I hadn’t read all the ones he cited, it made me stop and think for several moments about texts that I viewed as radical, and shaped my view of the world as an adolescent or young adult.  I never read 1984, but I did read and love Orwell’s Animal Farm in high school – it is a great example of political allegory.  I love the offbeat, radical characters of John Irving, particularly the title character in A Prayer for Owen Meany – I view Owen as the world’s smallest, and one of its greatest, radicals, even if he is a fictional character.  Several of the female characters of The Color Purple  by Alice Walker could be seen as radical – Shug Avery and Sofia, and ultimately the narrator, Celie, evolves into her own brand of radicalism.  These characters inspired me as a young woman in high school, when I read the novel on a yearly basis – they defied the norms of their race and time period in a way that still amazes me.

Lankes explains how some people who work in the field of  library science are not respected by those with an MLS degree (2011, p. 77).  This got me thinking about the whole idea of idea of experience vs. college degree (be it bachelor’s, master’s, or doctorate) and how it effects respect and position in the workplace.  At my past position as a preschool co-teacher in a large, more corporate childcare center, you didn’t necessarily need a bachelor’s degree or even a teaching license to be qualified as a head teacher – credentials were somewhat important, but so was past experience working with young children.  In my current job, there is a director of one of the programs who does not have a college degree, but I would say after 40+ years of working for the same organization, she knows the community better than any of the staff, and any of us working there would be foolish and ashamed to disrespect her.  I feel that although I have never worked in a library setting before, I have had five years of experience working directly with young children (and two more working with elementary-aged children), so I’ve found I can apply my specific knowledge and experiences to certain topics we discuss in IST 612, my youth services class, and I feel like my input and ideas are valued by the professor, Marilyn Arnone, and my fellow classmates.

Finally, I found the description of what the Free Library of Philadelphia did to empower the homeless of their community truly inspiring (Lankes, 2011, pp. 80-81).  Homeless people in our local public library are viewed as a “problem” by many people in our city.  It was also an issue that Robert Resnik, one of the co-directors, alluded to in my interview with him (R. Resnik, personal communication, June 29, 2011).  I think that we could draw inspiration from the Free Library in Philadelphia and come up with some innovative ideas for the homeless people that visit our library on a regular basis.  The idea of training them to work for the library and its cafe that the library in Philadelphia used reminded me of the organization Vermont Works for Women, which has a program called FRESH Food that trains women with various barriers to employment (former incarceration, poverty, lack of formal training) to work in the food service industry and also give back to their community by providing meals to local child care centers.  They work with several centers in the area that have Head Start collaboratives, including the one at my place of work (http://www.vtworksforwomen.org/women/programs/fresh-food/).  So I can personally attest to the variety and nutritional value of the food they served, as they provided lunches to my preschool students this year.  I love the collaborative aspect of the FRESH Food program and how it serves and empowers a variety of community members – children, women, professionals in the food service and early educational field.  Innovative ideas like these make me want to further explore the idea of empowering our local immigrant and refugee population, both as members of our community center and our public library.

References

Irving, J. (1990). A prayer for Owen Meany.  New York, NY: Ballantine Books

Lankes, R.D. (2011).  The Atlas of new librarianship.  Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.

Orwell, G. (1946).  Animal farm.  New York, NY: Harcourt, Brace, and Company.

Vermont Works for Women. (n.d.). FRESH food. Retrieved

      from http://www.vtworksforwomen.org/women/programs/fresh-food/.

Walker, A. (1982). The color purple.

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Comments on the second thread: Knowledge Creation

I enjoyed this thread more than the last because I found I could relate to it on a more personal level.   In the section on conversants, when reading about how one can converse with oneself through internal dialog, I immediately thought of Hamlet’s famous “To Be or Not to Be” speech and other Shakespearean soliloquies, and how they serve as a prime example of internal dialog and  someone trying to reach an agreement with himself or herself.  Thus I found it very amusing that Lankes mentioned Hamlet and Shakespeare in the very next paragraph (Lankes, 2011, p. 32).

The discussion of the different levels of language used in learning really made sense to me (Lankes, 2011, p. 33-34).  I feel like I am often functioning at the most basic level of language (L0) when I am feeling frustrated or unsure of myself – I’m getting by in a conversation as opposed to really adding to it.  This basic, directional level of language is something I am quite familiar with when starting a new school year with my preschool class – it is necessary to function at this level when they are first learning the routines and schedule of their day.  It also comes out more frequently during mealtimes when we need something passed across the table or they need something opened.  At that time our focus is not on having a conversation, but absorbed in the process of eating and nourishing our bodies.  However, I can now sympathize with my preschoolers – their following the steps of hanging up their backpack or hat in the morning, signing in, and washing their hands must have felt as strenuous the first time  as it did for me in learning how to search databases or create a webpage for this class.  For the html assignment especially, I had to have a friend explain some of the basics to me in a step-by-step order.  I also felt that I was at the most basic level of language with first starting to use the online catalog at my local library a few years ago to look for picture books to supplement the themes I was teaching my preschool class – I was more at a “what?” level, as in “What books will work for this theme?” Then, as time progressed and I got more used to using the system, I became more selective and was able to ask deeper questions, such as “Why will this book work better than the one I used last year?”  (Lankes, 2011, p.34).

I agree with Barry Schwartz’s Paradox of Choice, especially in regards to companies like iTunes or or Netflix (as cited by Lankes, 2011, p. 43).  However, I feel it doesn’t really take into account the factor of pure laziness, which I feel is common in Americans especially when they are searching for something for pleasure or for their own regard, and not as part of a task assigned by someone else.  Honestly, I don’t use iTunes that much because I feel like there are too many options, and I don’t check one of my e-mail accounts that often anymore because there are too many coupons and local newsletters I’ve signed up for, and don’t want to bother to sift through them all.   But on the other hand, I’m also too lazy to unsubscribe from them, because what if that really great deal comes along one day, or that event I really will want to go to?  So my e-mails sit unread, more because I’m being lazy and unorganized than because I feel like I might make a wrong choice or be unsatisfied.

The section on Scapes (Lankes, 2011, p.53-60) really intrigued me, as I have never used a Scape before.  The option of being able to talk/chat with someone online and include them as part of your search, and then save the whole process for someone else’s reference seems like a great interactive approach, and a wonderful way of collaborating with various people and organizations on bigger issues, like fundraising for a nonprofit (something I’m really interested in learning more about for my own center) or understanding why a school district is failing (an ongoing dilemma where I live).

Although I have really enjoyed reading the Atlas so far, I have to say my one criticism of it is the graphics and figures.  The text seems so rich and detailed it takes me a long time to read and ponder it, which I actually enjoy.  However, sometimes the figures are too simplified for me to understand, like in the case of Figures 35 and 36 on p.61 (Lankes, 2011) – I don’t fully understand the point the author is trying to make with them, as they are simply icons with little labeling and don’t give me enough context.  On the other hand, I find the graphics at the beginning of each thread to have too much going on (e.g. Figure 12 on p.30) – I know they serve as sort of a graphic preview or table of contents for what is going on in the thread but I feel there are too many circles for me to read and the font for the connectors is really small – I feel overwhelmed.  That being said, I would rather have some graphics than none at all as I am a very visual learner.

Reference

Lankes, R.D. (2011).  The Atlas of New Librarianship.  Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.

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Reflection upon introduction and first thread of The Atlas of New Librarianship

I really enjoy that the theme of social action runs throughout the Atlas.  It is discussed to some degree in the introduction, but is also inherent to the mission statement (Lankes, 2011).  I think this mission is in accord with Syracuse University’s pledge to scholarship in action found on the University’s webpage (http://www.syr.edu/), and is a personal mission I try to carry throughout my work and studies.

The main mission stated throughout the threads, often with accompanying graphics, is that “the mission of librarians is to improve society through facilitating knowledge creation in their communities” (Lankes, 2011, p. 15).  I also think that it is important that Lankes recognizes another mission in his introduction, that librarians “continue a centuries-long mission to use knowledge to better understand the past, make a better today, and invent an ideal future” (Lankes, 2011, p. 2).  This connects today’s librarians with librarians from hundreds of years ago, and puts librarians in an active role in shaping the present and future.  Lankes also makes an important point that the primary mission needs to be supported by the larger community that the library serves (Lankes, 2011, p.28-29).  With the focus of the mission on the librarians, Lankes supports the view that it is the librarian that makes a space a library – the books and other resources are just artifacts (Lankes, 2011, p.15-16).

Lankes claims that basis of our worldview is changing, with a shift in focus to human knowledge and the learning process instead of on things or artifacts like books (Lankes, 2011, p.23).  This has also changed what he defines as a librarian’s duties: knowing a community and its needs, building a collection, organizing programs, answering reference questions, completing inventory, and bringing his/her knowledge and worldview to the community (Lankes, 2011, p.24).  Most of these duties are related to knowledge acquisition, and emphasize that in order for a librarian to be proactive he/she must understand the motivations of the library’s patrons (Lankes, 2011, p.26-27).  I think connecting to patrons and the larger community and realizing their motivations and needs are what will keep libraries thriving for years to come, and a librarian’s role is crucial to this success.

Finally, I would just like to say I enjoy how the book is structured, with each of the threads building upon the others.  These threads also are connected to the overall theme and mission of the Atlas (Lankes, 2011, p.13).

References

Lankes, R.D. (2011).  The Atlas of New Librarianship.  Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.

http://www.syr.edu/

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Reflections on Social Networking in Libraries

This assignment for my 511 class opened up a new world for me, as I have never posted on a professional blog or been on Twitter before.  Of the two networking tools, I have to say my initial reaction is I like blogs more – I feel it gives you more pace to expand upon your ideas and fully reflect.  It remind me of the livejournal I kept during my undergrad years – nothing public, just a way of connecting and keeping in touch with my friends.  Twitter, on the other hand, just seems much more busy to me – the short phrasing and all the links will take some getting used to.  I also really like the idea of an RSS feed – as the Common Craft video explained, it seemed like the news and updates I was interested in were coming to me, instead of me having to constantly search for them (http://www.commoncraft.com/rss_plain_english).  I want to use the MSLIS wiki to search for blogs and podcasts suited to my particular tastes and interests, so I will be searching the listed recommendations more and also probably do some research of my own on blogs and podpasts (http://istwikis.syr.edu/mslis/index.php?title=Librarianship_Blogs_and_Podcasts).

In terms of the assigned  viewing and readings, I found all of the Common Craft video tutorials to be very helpful and humorous to a tech novice like me, in that they offered quick and easy to understand overviews on a variety of tech tools.  I love the sign language and hand gestures  and simple graphics and drawings that Lee LeFever utilized to illustrate his points.  The articles we read also gave me better insight into what “Web 2.0” and “Library 2.0” meant, as I was mostly unfamiliar with the terminology before now.  I like that Kelley stressed in her article that these new social networking tools serve as a way of collaborating with both staff and patrons of the library and that they could use them to target certain audiences (Kelley, 2008).  I strongly agree with one of Kelley’s major points in that adaptation to this new technology for libraries is essential in order to  have better communication with their patrons and promote their programs (Kelley, 2008).  In terms of the Funk article, I examined his ideas as not only applicable to libraries, but to other nonprofits as well, like the community center I currently work at.  We would benefit from expanding our Facebook page and encouraging more people to “friend” us like the libraries Funk described (Funk, 2009, p.49).  We would also benefit from adding a RSS-feed capability to our website and online newsletter at the center I work at (Funk, 2009, p.50), so we can notify our donors and other interested parties of upcoming events or what our different programs have been doing.

References: 

Funk, M.E. (2009) Testing the Web 2.0 waters.  American Libraries, 40 (1/2), pp. 48-51.  Retrieved

      from https://bbgroupb.syr.edu/bbcswebdav/courses/71966.1113/IST511Sum2010/web20waters.pdf

Kelley, J. (2008).  The making of a social librarian: How blogs, wikis, and Facebook have changed one librarian and her

      job.   College of DuPage: Library Scholarship.  Paper 2.  Retrieved from http://dc.cod.edu/librarypub/2/

LeFever, L. (2007, April 23). RSS in plain English. [Video file].  Retrieved

       from http://www.commoncraft.com/rss_plain_english

LeFever, L. (2007, June 27).  Social networking in plain English. [Video file].

       Retrieved from http://www.commoncraft.com/video-social-networking

LeFever, L. (2007, November 30).  Blogs in plain English. [Video file].  Retrieved

       from  http://www.commoncraft.com/blogs

LeFever, L. (2007, May 29).  Wikis in plain English. [Video file].  Retrieved from

       http://www.commoncraft.com/video-wikis-plain-english

LeFever, L.  (2008, April 21).  Podcasting in plain English. [Video file].  Retrieved

        from http://www.commoncraft.com/podcasting

511 Gateway Class, Syracuse University.  Librarianship Blogs and Podcasts [Web wiki post].  Retrieved

        from http://istwikis.syr.edu/mslis/index.php?title=Librarianship_Blogs_and_Podcasts

 

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